‘Blues Brothers’ 40th Anniversary: Old Joliet Prison Back To Life

It was 40 years ago today, June 16, 1980, that a new movie featuring Elwood Blues and Joliet Jake and their mission to save a Catholic orphanage premiered before a small group of suburban politicians and film crew members. The Blues Brothers hit box offices four days later and Joliet’s never been the same since.

The Friendship of Bette Davis and Patrick Kelly

I started working as a press attaché for the fashion designer Patrick Kelly in Paris in 1986, a time in my life when work often stretched deep into the evenings.  Inspiration came to Patrick, the first American (and first African-American) admitted to Chambre syndicale du pret-a-porter, in the wee hours. People in American fashion passing through Paris knew if they stopped by 6 Rue du Parc Royal late at night they were likely to find him hard at work as the party built around him.

Psycho at 60: the enduring power of Hitchcock’s shocking game-changer

The defining shot in Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho is not any of the images in the famed shower sequence, or the overhead of the private detective getting knifed at the top of stairs or the reveal of “mother” as she’s turned slowly in the swivel chair. It happens at the very beginning, as Hitchcock pans and dissolves across downtown Phoenix, Arizona, before finally settling on the room where Marion Crane (Janet Leigh), a bored real-estate secretary, is having an afternoon tryst with her boyfriend Sam. The camera enters the scene through a crack in the window, under the shades, furtively catching a peep. Hitchcock is the voyeur, and so are we.