Atomically thin material could cut need for transistors in half

With the development of carbon nanotubes and graphene, scientists were given an entirely new collection of materials to work with: sheets and tubes that could be consistently made with thicknesses roughly those of individual atoms. These materials hold the promise of building electronic devices with dimensions smaller than is currently possible through any other process and with properties that can be tuned by using different starting materials.

Stamping Out Andrew Jackson on the $20 Bill Won’t Be So Easy

The administration’s decision to postpone the $20 makeover has inspired some Americans to make their own Tubmans. An artist named Dano Wall has been making stamps of Tubman’s face that can be used to blot out Jackson’s on the $20. (After Mnuchin’s announcement, the stamp sold out on Etsy, though you can also make your own.) Wall told the Washington Post that he’d like to get thousands of stamps out there: “If there are 5,000 people consistently stamping currency, we could get a significant percent of circulating $20 bills [with the Tubman] stamp, at which point it would be impossible to ignore.”

Despite the improbability of achieving widespread visibility, the idea of turning greenbacks into vehicles for political messages isn’t new.

Remembering the US soldiers who refused to murder Native Americans at Sand Creek

While the Sand Creek Massacre has been the subject of numerous books, much less attention has been given to two heroes of this horrific event: U.S. soldiers Captain Silas Soule and Lt. Joseph Cramer.

These were men who rejected the violence and genocide inherent in the “conquest of the West.” They did so by personally refusing to take part in the murder of peaceful people, while ordering the men under their command to stand down. Their example breaks the conventional frontier narrative that has come to define the clash between Colonial settlers and Native peoples as one of civilization versus savagery.

30-plus years of Apple’s HyperCard, the missing link to the Web

The Computer Lab’s Beyond Cyberpunk Hypercard stack

From the archives: Before the World Wide Web did anything, HyperCard did everything.

Update 2019: It’s Memorial Day weekend here in the US, and the Ars staff has a long weekend accordingly. Many will spend that time relaxing or traveling with family, but maybe someone will dust off their old MacIntosh and fire up Hypercard, a beloved bit of Apple software and development kit in the pre-Web era. The application turns 32 later this summer, so with staff off we thought it was time to resurface this look at Hypercard’s legacy. This piece originally ran on May 30, 2012 as Hypercard approached its 25th anniversary, and it appears unchanged below.

Former GOP Rep. Tom Coleman: Trump, Pence are illegitimate. Impeach them.

Former GOP Rep. Tom Coleman, from Missouri, penned a powerful Op-Ed that appeared in The Kansas City Star Wednesday. In it he calls not only for the impeachment of the pretender Trump, but also his chief enabler, V.P. Pence and says their installation in the two top positions in the executive branch was illegitimate. 

Warren and AOC have questions about Steve Mnuchin’s role in Sears’ collapse (and they have receipts)

Sen. Elizabeth Warren and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez are teaming up to ask important questions about Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin’s role in the collapse of retail empire Sears. More than 175,000 Sears employees lost their jobs while a handful of billionaires, including Mnuchin, walked away with billions. And Warren and Ocasio-Cortez want answers.

Mnuchin and his old pals sucked everything out of the company and left employees high and dry, without even a penny of severance pay. This is happening across the nation as investment firms buy up, raid, and tear down retail outlets.