Man growing a nose on his forehead

Via Weird Picture Archive, 2015

A Chinese man has had a new nose grown on his forehead.

The man, who has only been named as Xiaolian, had the treatment to create a replacement for his original nose which was infected and deformed. The procedure was carried out at a hospital in Fuzhou, Fujian province.

The 22-year-old damaged his nose in a traffic accident in August 2012 but failed to seek treatment. As a result, an infection corroded the cartilage leaving the surgeons unable to repair it.

They were left with no choice but to grow him a new nose and then to transplant it in place of his damaged one. The nose was created by placing a skin tissue expander onto Xiaolian’s forehead.

This was cut into the shape of a nose and was supported by cartilage taken from the man’s ribs.

Surgeons say that the nose has developed well and that the transplant surgery will be carried out soon.

America In The Eyes Of The World – A Guest Post by Gary Metcalfe

Filosofa's Word

Today I am happy to present the second guest post in response to my plea for friends outside the U.S. to give us their insight about how they view the U.S. today.  This one is by Gary Metcalfe, who blogs as bereavedandbeingasingleparent, or as I call him, Bereaved Dad.  Thank you, Gary, for taking the time and effort to write this illuminating piece!


IS YORKSHIRE CLOSER TO WASHINGTON OR PARIS

Geography doesn’t really come easily to a simple Yorkshire chap like myself. I’m lucky to find my way round the house never mind circumnavigate the globe.  But distance wise I am pretty sure we are closer to France than America. It has always puzzled me if I should call America – America or is it the USA? Let’s go for America. So, although we are physically closer to France, in terms of relationships are we closer to Washington or Paris?

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