BOOKS: ‘The Jungle’, by Upton Sinclair

WIKIPEDIA:

The Jungle is a 1906 novel by the American journalist and novelist Upton Sinclair (1878–1968). Sinclair wrote the novel to portray the harsh conditions and exploited lives of immigrants in the United States in Chicago and similar industrialized cities. His primary purpose in describing the meat industry and its working conditions was to advance socialism in the United States. However, most readers were more concerned with several passages exposing health violations and unsanitary practices in the American meat packing industry during the early 20th century, which greatly contributed to a public outcry which led to reforms including the Meat Inspection Act. Sinclair famously said of the public reaction, “I aimed at the public’s heart, and by accident I hit it in the stomach.”

How Ellen and William Craft Escaped Slavery

Ellen Craft’s mother was an enslaved woman of African descent and some European ancestry, Maria, in Clinton, Georgia. Her father was the enslaver of her mother, Major James Smith. Smith’s wife did not like Ellen’s presence, as she resembled Major Smith’s family. When Ellen was eleven years old, she was sent to Macon, Georgia, with a daughter of the Smith’s, as a wedding gift to the daughter.

In Macon, Ellen met William Craft, an enslaved man, and craftsman