Pierre Kompany’s long road from DRC camp to Belgium’s first black mayor

INTRO:

Vincent Kompany’s life is the stuff of little boys’ and girls’ dreams. Scorer of a dazzling goal of the season, captain of Manchester City’s all-conquering Premier League champions and on Saturday, the 32-year-old hopes to pick up the FA Cup at Wembley in front of 90,000 fans.

The Belgian international’s travails on the field will fill the newspaper back pages, but the drama on the pitch will struggle to match the life story of the 71-year-old man who will be cheering him on the from the stands.

Last October, Pierre Kompany, father to Christel, 34, Vincent, and François, 29, was elected as Belgium’s first black mayor, in what is hoped will prove to be a watershed moment for a country that has struggled to reconcile its colonial past.

From Nazi to football hero: the incredible story of Man City’s Bert Trautmann

Famous for playing the 1956 FA cup final with a broken neck, Trautmann went from Nazi soldier to goalkeeping legend and symbol of truth and reconciliation. Now, his life is the subject of a new film

Why the privileged white-male now bombs at the box office

As Esquire magazine discovered a little too late, nobody wants to hear about “what it’s like to grow up white, middle class, and male” in today’s America – especially not during Black History Month. Esquire’s current cover story is about a Trump-supporting 17-year-old from Wisconsin in the era of #MeToo and toxic masculinity, and has been met with Twitter outrage and conservative counter-outrage. “Well, they don’t yet have a middle-class, teen, white boy month,” observed one Fox News pundit. Perhaps they should go to the movies a bit more. It’s been middle-class, teen, white boy month there for years, but now nobody wants to hear about it.

The Golden Age Of Blacks In Television: The Late 1960s

“Golden Age” is a term to label that period in the history of a nation, movement, artistic medium or the like during which its greatest achievements were realized. It is not an absolute term since it does not intend to describe the best possible epoch. That being the case, there can be no doubt that for African Americans in television, the last half of the 1960s was a Golden Age.