Simon Pegg: "Theatrical Cinema, Sadly, Appears to Be Dying"

Pegg mentioned that big studios must often rely on big-budget superheroes to succeed. Meanwhile, “there is this burst of creative excitement” in TV, and “anything seems possible,” he said. “What used to be this little, poor cousin of the auspicious silver screen is now dominating it, and kind of offering so much more.”

Let’s Face It: The 2019 Summer Movie Season Was Dreadful

With summer coming to a close, we can finally say goodbye to what was arguably the most horrendous movie season in the history of summer movie seasons. Good riddance.

Profits dipped and quality plunged. Ticket sales in the United States and Canada are projected to total $4.33 billion, a 2% decline from last year, according to the media analytics firm ComScore. But the fine print is what’s important. Disney monopolized the summer to a vast degree, meaning a disconcerting amount of that revenue belongs to one studio alone. Even sequels that seemed like surefire hits for rival companies — Warner Bros.’ “Godzilla: King of the Monsters” and Sony’s “The Angry Birds Movie 2,” for example — fell short of expectations.

Nearing the endgame: is Hollywood’s lust for sequels destroying cinema?

Coming not so shortly: a new helping of either Star Wars or Avatar for every Christmas between 2021 and 2027. Disney’s latest release schedule also promises eight more Marvel comic-book adaptations by 2022. Meanwhile, this year will see the spawn of not just behemoths such as Avengers, X-Men, Frozen, Toy Story, Spider-Man, The Lego Movie and Star Wars, but also less obvious franchise-launchers such as Godzilla, Men in Black, Shaun the Sheep, Angry Birds, Kingsman, Zombieland, Shaft and even Rambo. Never before have film sequels been so many and so varied.

They are nothing new, of course.