Here’s What Punk Rock Looks Like Today

INTRO:

In the late 1970s and into the ’80s, punk rock was more than just a genre of music — it was a community of inclusion and a bold statement against the status quo.

For people of color in particular, punk rock offered a medium that celebrated individuality and offered a platform for political and social critique. Black punk bands like Bad Brains,Pure Hell, and Death not only pushed the boundaries of what rock music was capable of, but shattered expectations of how people of color are seen within the genre. Today, punk rock is more diverse than ever, as collectives like Atlanta-based Punk Black help foster the community by hosting concerts that highlight artists of different races, religions, and nationalities.

Radio silence: how the disappearance of rural stations takes America’s soul with them

At a time when local newspapers are vanishing, the loss of a radio station leaves a community with another cultural and informational deficit

CHICAGO: Heartland Cafe to Close After 42 Years

On Dec. 31, after 42 years, an iconic Rogers Park restaurant and community hub will close.

The Heartland Cafe, which has been striving to serve “good, wholesome food for the mind and body” with a healthy side order of progressive politics since 1976 will soon be no more.

The vegetarian-leaning restaurant, on the corner of Glenwood and Lunt, was the creation of young progressive activists.