Zuckerberg faces heat in Congress: “It’s almost like you think this is a joke”

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg was on Capitol Hill Wednesday to testify before the the House Financial Services Committee about Libra, Facebook’s controversial cryptocurrency plan. At least, Libra was theoretically his reason for being in Washington, DC. Once he was in the hot seat, however, lawmakers pinned him down with questions about basically everything, making clear just how much ire the ostensible social network now draws at the highest level.

Tory minister Liz Truss, admits illegal arms sales to Saudi Arabia again and says ‘more cases could come to light’

The government has again admitted breaching a court order banning arms sales to Saudi Arabia over concerns they could be used in the Yemen war.

International trade secretary Liz Truss faced calls to resign for the second time in 10 days after she revealed her department had granted a third unlawful license relating for military equipment that could be used in a war fuelling “the world’s worst humanitarian crisis”.

Brexit Party MEPs earn four times more money on top of their EU salaries than any other party

Labour MEP Julie Ward told The Independent: “The Brexit Party quite clearly treat being elected as an MEP as a part time role and are not interested in serving their constituents in the European Parliament. They are not a political party but rather a company, and these figures expose that. While railing against the ‘elite” they are actually part of the 1%.” 

UE: Deploying Facebook’s ‘Like’ button on your website makes you a joint data slurper

Organisations that deploy Facebook’s ubiquitous “Like” button on their websites risk falling foul of the General Data Protection Regulation following a landmark ruling by the European Court of Justice.

The EU’s highest court has decided that website owners can be held liable for data collection when using the so-called “social sharing” widgets.

Comic-Con hits 50: from fandom hotel basement celebration to greedy Hollywood hangout

The sprawling convention today draws Hollywood A-listers like Arnold Schwarzenegger, Patrick Stewart and the cast of “Game of Thrones” to its frantically hyped panels, where billion-dollar franchises are launched.

But the first iteration — the brainchild of an unemployed 36-year-old comic collector and his five teenage acolytes — drew just 100 people to a seedy hotel basement down the road in March 1970.