CENSORSHIP: Marvel Comics/Disney Is Doubling Down on Its Misguided Crusade to Remain ‘Apolitical,’ and It’s Using Captain America to Do It

August 27, 2019

The Hollywood Reporter revealed today that early preview copies sent to retailers of the 80th-anniversary collection, Marvel Comics #1000, included an essay by Mark Waid that accompanied an image of Captain America by John Cassaday and Laura Martin. However, in the issue set to hit stands tomorrow, the essay—seen by comics retailers in issues sent out as previews—was replaced with what THR describes as a “less critical piece, also credited to Waid, that is more directly tied to Captain America, and notably less critical of the United States.”

If this suspect had been black he’d have been shot 20 times; instead, we get a Benny Hill sketch

According to media reports, the man, 18-year-old Matthew Thomas Bernard, allegedly killed the wife, son and mother-in-law of Blake Bivens, who pitches for a minor league affiliate of the Tampa Bay Rays. And when police caught up with Bernard, he was naked and running for his life.

Old Navy hid black workers during ‘Queer Eye’ taping and bused in white replacements

Monae Alvarado, a Cambodian woman who works at the City Center retailer, said the store employs only people of color at that location, but they were kept out of sight while the show was recorded for an upcoming episode, reported Philadelphia Magazine.

This passage was deleted from the Declaration of Independence — here’s what it reveals about motivation for the American revolution

In particular, writer Nikole Hannah-Jones provoked controversy when she asserted:

She noted that “10 of this nation’s first 12 presidents were enslavers,” undermining claims that the country was founded as a democracy. She also pointed out that the founders were themselves actively conflicted about the contradiction of slavery persisting in a country supposedly founded on freedom. Thomas Jefferson, she said, even included a passage in a draft of the Declaration of Independence that tried to claim that the institution “wasn’t the colonists’ fault,” instead placing the blame on King George.