50 Years After Meeting at Woodstock, Couple Finally Finds a Photo Proving It

For 50 years, Judy and Jerry Griffin have been telling friends and family the fairy tale story of how they met on the way to Woodstock in 1969 and have been together ever since. The only downside to their meet-cute is that they never had any physical proof that they were at Woodstock together — until two months ago.

Jun Fujita: Remembering a Forgotten Photographer of Chicago History

He took photographs of the Eastland disaster, the race riots, and every picture you’ve seen of the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre.

Jun Fujita was also the country’s first Japanese-American photojournalist.

Chicago Tonight unearths the buried legacy of the great photographer, and explores the multifaceted background of a man who was also a poet, a carpenter and visual artist.

Secrets and crimes: gay South Korean soldiers trapped in legal bind

Productive and driven, he was a model army officer, but he had a secret: he was in a gay sexual relationship with a fellow soldier — a crime under South Korea’s military law.

He kept his sexuality hidden from everyone, including friends and family, only meeting his lover off-base and after work.

Inter-caste and Inter-faith Couples On the Run in India

Most Indian families still prefer marriages arranged within their religion and caste. Marriages outside these rigid boundaries have often led to violent consequences, including “honour” killings. But some young Indians are still willing to defy their families and communities for love, reports the BBC’s Divya Arya.

Mixed Britannia #1: 1910-1939

The previously untold history of Britain’s mixed-race community and the many love stories that created it. In the first of this three-part series, George Alagiah tells the story of romance in the First World War between female workers and foreign seamen, the street riots it led to, and how Britain just escaped laws preventing mixed marriage and the excesses of race science.

Mixed Britannia #2: 1940-1965

Mixed Britannia #3: 1965-2011

BBC Series, 2014

Quentin C. Aanenson – Unsent Letter to Jackie: December 5, 1944

Dear Jackie,

For the past two hours, I’ve been sitting here alone in my tent, trying to figure out just what I should do and what I should say in this letter in response to your letters and some questions you have asked. I have purposely not told you much about my world over here, because I thought it might upset you. Perhaps that has been a mistake, so let me correct that right now. I still doubt if you will be able to comprehend it. I don’t think anyone can who has not been through it.

I live in a world of death. I have watched my friends die in a variety of violent ways…

Sometimes it’s just an engine failure on takeoff resulting in a violent explosion. There’s not enough left to bury. Other times, it’s the deadly flak that tears into a plane. If the pilot is lucky, the flak kills him. But usually he isn’t, and he burns to death as his plane spins in. Fire is the worst. In early September one of my good friends crashed on the edge of our field. As he was pulled from the burning plane, the skin came off his arms. His face was almost burned away. He was still conscious and trying to talk. You can’t imagine the horror. 

So far, I have done my duty in this war. I have never aborted a mission or failed to dive on a target no matter how intense the flak. I have lived for my dreams for the future. But like everything else around me, my dreams are dying, too. In spite of everything, I may live through this war and return to Baton Rouge. But I am not the same person you said goodbye to on May 3. No one can go through this and not change. We are all casualties. In the meantime, we just go on. Some way, somehow, this will all have an ending. Whatever it is, I am ready for it.

Quentin