Dancing in the streets: The heyday of Black DJs and the music that moved Black America

The Supremes (left) and Martha and the Vandellas in London during a 24-day music tour, March 15, 1965.

Though Donald Trump has tried his best to ruin Juneteenth weekend for all of us who celebrate with his Stephen Miller-inspired racist routine, Orange Trumpie can’t stop no show. We are still BBQing and though younger folks may be listening to hip-hop and other genres of music, some of us older folks are hearkening back to the hits of the late ‘50s, through the ‘60s and into the ‘70s during the heyday of rhythm and blues and what later became Black rock ‘n’ roll.

Movies, Music, and Books That Enter the Public Domain Today

Today isn’t just a day to nurse your hangover from New Year’s Eve—it’s also a day to celebrate the public domain. Movies, books, music, and more from 1924 are all entering the public domain today, meaning that you’re free to download, upload, and share these titles however you see fit. And it’s completely legal.

50 Years Later, The Archies’ ‘Sugar, Sugar’ Is Still ‘Really Sweet’

1969…

It was also a great year for music — but who knew that the year that produced songs like “Fortunate Son,” “Age Of Aquarius” and “Everyday People” would crown a bubblegum pop tune by a fictional cartoon band as its top song of the year?

“Sugar, Sugar” by The Archies – yes, from the comics – was named No. 1 on Billboard’s Year-End Countdown in 1969.

50 Years After Meeting at Woodstock, Couple Finally Finds a Photo Proving It

For 50 years, Judy and Jerry Griffin have been telling friends and family the fairy tale story of how they met on the way to Woodstock in 1969 and have been together ever since. The only downside to their meet-cute is that they never had any physical proof that they were at Woodstock together — until two months ago.

Male-Female Duos of the 1950s and 1960s

Via TwixNMix

Les Paul and Mary Ford – Mockin’ Bird Hill (1951), How High the Moon (1951), The World is Waiting for the Sunrise (1951), Tiger Rag (1951), Bye Bye Blues (1953), Vaya Con Dios (1953)
Sonny & Cher – I Got You Babe (1965), Baby Don’t Go (1965), Little Man (1966), The Beat Goes On (1967)
Marvin Gaye & Tammi Terrell – Ain’t No Mountain High Enough (1967), Your Precious Love (1967), Ain’t Nothing Like the Real Thing (1968), You’re All I Need to Get By (1968)
Ike & Tina Turner – A Fool in Love (1960), I Idolize You (1960), It’s Gonna Work Out Fine (1961), Poor Fool (1962), Tra La La La La (1962)
Peaches and Herb – Let’s Fall in Love (1967), Close Your Eyes (1967), Love is Strange (1967)
Nino Tempo & April Stevens – Deep Purple (1963), Whispering (1963), All Strung Out (1966)
Mickey & Sylvia – Love is Strange (1957), There Ought To Be a Law (1957), What Would I Do (1960)

Shirley and Lee – I’m Gone (1952), Feel So Good (1955), Let the Good Times Roll (1956), I Feel Good (1956)
Inez and Charlie Foxx – Mockingbird (1963), (1-2-3-4-5-6-7) Count The Days (1967)

Here’s What Punk Rock Looks Like Today

INTRO:

In the late 1970s and into the ’80s, punk rock was more than just a genre of music — it was a community of inclusion and a bold statement against the status quo.

For people of color in particular, punk rock offered a medium that celebrated individuality and offered a platform for political and social critique. Black punk bands like Bad Brains,Pure Hell, and Death not only pushed the boundaries of what rock music was capable of, but shattered expectations of how people of color are seen within the genre. Today, punk rock is more diverse than ever, as collectives like Atlanta-based Punk Black help foster the community by hosting concerts that highlight artists of different races, religions, and nationalities.