Netflix won’t work on these devices after December 1

Last month, Netflix began notifying users that some older devices would no longer be supported by the platform starting on December 1 due to ‘technical limitations.’ The advisory didn’t include any specific models, however. Roku had acknowledged that its first two devices would lose support, but no other details beyond that were available. Now we finally know more.

Old Navy hid black workers during ‘Queer Eye’ taping and bused in white replacements

Monae Alvarado, a Cambodian woman who works at the City Center retailer, said the store employs only people of color at that location, but they were kept out of sight while the show was recorded for an upcoming episode, reported Philadelphia Magazine.

‘Derry Girls’ is the best teen show out right now

( Originally airing on Channel 4 )

The hilarity of Derry Girls is so powerful that it transcends language. The Irish sitcom, currently streaming on Netflix, follows four girls (and their teen guy accomplice) who are growing up in Northern Ireland during the last years of the Troubles. A good 74 percent of any given episode is likely unintelligible to anyone who didn’t grow up hearing an Irish accent; it took me a few episodes to admit defeat and finally switch on the subtitles. But subtitles or not, and my cursory knowledge of the Troubles notwithstanding, I still found myself cackling at one of my favorite new shows and falling in love with Erin, Orla, Clare, Michelle, and James.

Netflix and Amazon behave like old-style Hollywood moguls, warns Mike Leigh

Film and TV drama is booming, with the streaming services Netflix, Hulu and Amazon offering audiences hit after hit on demand. But, according to the acclaimed director Mike Leigh, this comes with an unfortunate side effect: that young British film-makers are being held back by a powerful “new breed of executive”.

‘Patriot Act’ Is Not Afraid of Silicon Valley

Hasan Minhaj’s Netflix show goes further than even John Oliver in skewering technology.

On a recent episode of Patriot Act, “Content Moderation and Free Speech,” Hasan Minhaj walks onstage, framed by graphics flipping through images of Mark Zuckerberg, Sheryl Sandberg, floppy disks, and the Facebook thumbs-up. He soon asks the audience—and the viewers watching online—to think back to a time when we were excited to connect to the entire world through the internet.

Today, Minhaj explains, we’d prefer to log off. But social media is unavoidable: