1980s Max Headroom predicted the head-exploding information overload of today.

This unrelenting drumbeat leaves many people feeling as though their heads are going to explode. 

Each day, it seems, brings a bewildering flood of news stories: impeachment hearings, the mess in Syria, another mass shooting, corporate malfeasance, the details of each development quickly surpassed by some new outrage powered by algorithm. 

Is BBC news broken? And if so, how do we fix it?

Our national broadcaster has been defeated by Brexit; confounded either by the explosion of a rightwing populist politics it doesn’t know how to cover, or by growing millennial intolerance of views they abhor being given a platform, or possibly by both. An explosion of fake news, the BBC’s own neurosis about whether it’s too middle-class for its own good, and the vocal indignation of Labour activists who feel the media is institutionally biased against Jeremy Corbyn have all combined to create a perfectly bewildering storm for a once-loved institution.