NASA scientists detect parallel universe ‘next to ours’ where time runs backwards

An experiment in the frozen wastes of Antarctica has revealed evidence of a universe born in the same Big Bang as ours – but with rules of physics that are completely the opposite.

Giant Molecules Exist in Two Places at Once in Unprecedented Quantum Experiment

That’s something that scientists have long known is theoretically true based on a few facts: Every particle or group of particles in the universe is also a wave—even large particles, even bacteria, even human beings, even planets and stars. And waves occupy multiple places in space at once. So any chunk of matter can also occupy two places at once. Physicists call this phenomenon “quantum superposition,” and for decades, they have demonstrated it using small particles.

But in recent years, physicists have scaled up their experiments, demonstrating quantum superposition using larger and larger particles. 

Ghostly galaxies hint at dark matter breakthrough

Two newfound galaxies appear to be devoid of the substance, paradoxically providing more proof dark matter exists

Much as a ripple in a pond reveals a thrown stone, the existence of the mysterious stuff known as dark matter is inferred via its wider cosmic influence. Astronomers cannot see it directly, but its gravity sculpts the birth, shape and movement of galaxies. This makes a discovery from last year all the more unexpected: a weirdly diffuse galaxy that seemed to harbor no dark matter at all.

What’s the Loudest Sound in the Universe?

INTRO:

The human tolerance for sound is, on a galactic level, puny. Volcano eruptions, jackhammer-intensive construction work, My Bloody Valentine concerts—these tinnitus-inducing phenomena are barely whispers besides the majestic, roiling bursts and collisions going on in outer space.

Of course, much of this activity is technically soundless—space’s atmosphere lacks the material that make sound waves possible. So for this week’s Giz Asks, we asked experts in astronomy and astrophysics what the loudest sound wouldbe, if sound as we understand it existed up there.

The iconic periodic table could have looked very different

The periodic table stares down from the walls of just about every chemistry lab. The credit for its creation generally goes to Dimitri Mendeleev, a Russian chemist who in 1869 wrote out the known elements (of which there were 63 at the time) on cards and then arranged them in columns and rows according to their chemical and physical properties. To celebrate the 150th anniversary of this pivotal moment in science, the UN has proclaimed 2019 to be the International year of the Periodic Table.

But the periodic table didn’t actually start with Mendeleev. Many had tinkered with arranging the elements.