Dancing in the streets: The heyday of Black DJs and the music that moved Black America

The Supremes (left) and Martha and the Vandellas in London during a 24-day music tour, March 15, 1965.

Though Donald Trump has tried his best to ruin Juneteenth weekend for all of us who celebrate with his Stephen Miller-inspired racist routine, Orange Trumpie can’t stop no show. We are still BBQing and though younger folks may be listening to hip-hop and other genres of music, some of us older folks are hearkening back to the hits of the late ‘50s, through the ‘60s and into the ‘70s during the heyday of rhythm and blues and what later became Black rock ‘n’ roll.

‘The Good Place’ and Chidi help redefine the Black nerd

William Jackson Harper is nervous. He and I have been on the phone for five minutes, and he’s walking around his living room as we speak, analyzing everything he’s saying and hoping he hasn’t said anything stupid. I can relate.

“Are you pacing right now?” I asked. “Because I pace all the time.”

“Yeah, I’m pacing,” he said. “I am.”

As a self-described neurotic, he takes his nervousness as a given. Later, he tells me about how hard it is to make dinner plans. He and his girlfriend have talked about it. 

April 2018: 13 Reasons SUPERMAN Still Inspires Us After 80 Years

At the outset of SUPERMAN WEEK, I wanted to take a look at just why the Man of Steel has endured for 80 years. I enlisted podcaster and documentary filmmaker Anthony Desiato of My Comic Shop History to take a crack at it.

Why Anthony? For one thing, he’s a Superfan of the first magnitude. For another, he’s 20 years younger than me — a potent reminder that Superman’s appeal is timeless and enduring, decade after decade. Not that we really need such a reminder, but it’s still heartening to see.