The game and comics industries are grappling with widespread allegations of harassment and abuse

The wider entertainment industry is having a moment. 

Long after people who work in the film and television industries started naming and shaming carefully hidden abusers and bigots, those in the video game, tabletop, and comic book industries are opening up about abusers in their fields as well. Over the past several weeks, accusations have been flooding onto social media, inspiring even more individuals to step forward with their own personal accounts. And, like much of 2020 that we’ve experienced so far, it all seems to be happening so fast.

Why do light-skinned women dominate the pop charts?

It seems every conversation about colourism in pop music must come back to Beyoncé. So it was when Mathew Knowles, record exec, former Destiny’s Child manager and Beyoncé’s father, appeared on SiriusXM radio to discuss research by Texas Southern University, where he is a visiting professor. Their study found that over a 15-year period it was lighter-skinned black women – the likes of Alicia Keys, Rihanna, Nicki Minaj, Mariah Carey and, of course, Beyoncé – who dominated Top 40 airplay. When asked how different Beyoncé’s career would have been had she been darker-skinned, Knowles was unequivocal: “I think it would’ve affected her success.”

Why the privileged white-male now bombs at the box office

As Esquire magazine discovered a little too late, nobody wants to hear about “what it’s like to grow up white, middle class, and male” in today’s America – especially not during Black History Month. Esquire’s current cover story is about a Trump-supporting 17-year-old from Wisconsin in the era of #MeToo and toxic masculinity, and has been met with Twitter outrage and conservative counter-outrage. “Well, they don’t yet have a middle-class, teen, white boy month,” observed one Fox News pundit. Perhaps they should go to the movies a bit more. It’s been middle-class, teen, white boy month there for years, but now nobody wants to hear about it.

Esha Gupta: Has Instagram exposed everyday racism in India?

Up until Monday, Esha Gupta was just a Bollywood actress with a passion for Arsenal football club.

That changed after the actress decided to share a screengrab of a WhatsApp conversation in which a friend mocked the team’s Nigerian star, Alex Iwobi, as a “gorilla” and “Neanderthal” who “evolution had stopped for”.