Radio silence: how the disappearance of rural stations takes America’s soul with them

At a time when local newspapers are vanishing, the loss of a radio station leaves a community with another cultural and informational deficit

New York’s Legendary WPLJ-FM to Sign Off Friday

Legendary New York radio station WPLJ — which launched in 1971 as a pioneering AOR (album oriented rock) station, then embraced the MTV-inspired new wave movement of the early ‘80s and eventually morphed into a hot adult contemporary outlet — will go dark Friday at 7 p.m. ET.

The frequency, acquired from Cumulus Media by leading religious programmers Educational Media Foundation earlier this year, will immediately transition into a contemporary Christian music station, an affiliate of the national K-LOVE network.

Dame June Whitfield, star of ‘Absolutely Fabulous’, dies aged 93

The London-born actress was a regular fixture on TV and radio for six decades, starring in Carry On films, Hancock’s Half Hour, and even Friends.

At 89, she appeared in EastEnders as Sister Ruth, a nun with a secret about Kat Moon. At 92, she was made a dame.

Her agent said she died peacefully on Friday night.

War of the Worlds …

Filosofa's Word

It was 80 years ago today that Orson Welles literally sent the nation into a panic with his hour-long radio broadcast, War of the Worlds.  According to History.com

Orson WellesOrson Welles was only 23 years old when his Mercury Theater company decided to update H.G. Wells’ 19th-century science fiction novel War of the Worlds for national radio. Despite his age, Welles had been in radio for several years, most notably as the voice of “The Shadow” in the hit mystery program of the same name. “War of the Worlds” was not planned as a radio hoax, and Welles had little idea of the havoc it would cause.

The show began on Sunday, October 30, at 8 p.m. A voice announced: “The Columbia Broadcasting System and its affiliated stations present Orson Welles and the Mercury Theater on the air in ‘War of the Worlds’ by H.G. Wells.”

Sunday evening in 1938…

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