Cosmo the Bull Calf Has Been Genetically Engineered to Produce 75% Male Offspring

Genetic engineering can produce some pretty scary results. Just recently, scientists at the University of California, Davis, developed a bull calf, named Cosmo, who is capable of producing 75% male (or at least male-looking) offspring.

Clowns to the left of me, jokers to the right

Here I am, stuck in the middle with you. I was astonished to find that my tea party prepper brother and new age sister shared the same anti-science, anti-government beliefs. Yes, the tea party brother owns a ton of guns while my new age sister does not. But both share the same world view that government is hacking our brains, whether it’s Bill Gates and vaccines or a pandemic hoax designed to frighten the masses into conformity. Both reject science and quote vague conspiracy theories ranging from the obscure to the downright laughable. 

Another disaster is ready to catch the US unprepared: Drought

As the Colorado River slowly dwindles, groundwater resources are depleted, and wells are being dug ever deeper, the specter of drought looms in the US—particularly, but not exclusively, in the arid Southwest.

Preparing for gradual changes like these is not sexy or popular. But there is a huge amount of crucial work to be done to mitigate the worst possible outcomes of increasing drought, writes environmental politics researcher Megan Mullin in a paper in Science this week. 

How a meteorite destroyed one of humanity’s first settlements

To the South of Turkey, to the West of Iraq, to the North of Saudi Arabia and the Northeast of Egypt is a country called Syria. This country is home to a site of some major historical, cultural, and evironmental significance. This site was one of the first known human settlements on earth: Abu Hureyra. A report from researchers from UC Santa Barbara showed that this site may very well have been annihilated by the cosmic impact of a well-placed comet.

Did humans truly domesticate dogs?

Though archaeology can help us pin down the when and where of dog domestication (current thinking is that it happened at least 15,000 years ago in Europe, Asia, or both), bones are mostly silent on the how and the why of this story. By studying other canids like foxes and wolves, and by analyzing dog genes, behavior, and brains—their sweet, friendly, trusting brains—researchers are developing new ideas about how the big bad wolf became the dear little dog.