In The 1920s, A Community Conspired To Kill Native Americans For Their Oil Money

I read about this a few years ago, somewhere else.

Generations ago, the American Indian Osage tribe was compelled to move. Not for the first time, white settlers pushed them off their land in the 1800s. They made their new home in a rocky, infertile area in northeast Oklahoma in hopes that settlers would finally leave them alone.

As it turned out, the land they had chosen was rich in oil, and in the early 20th century, members of the tribe became spectacularly wealthy. They bought cars and built mansions; they made so much oil money that the government began appointing white guardians to “help” them spend it.

And then Osage members started turning up dead.

Elizabeth Cotten: The black female musician you may not know, has written many songs you probably do

The twice-nominated folk musician, Elizabeth “Libba” Cotten won her first Grammy at 90 years old.

Fiercely proud of her North Carolina roots, her lyrics and melodies weave intricate tales about her life in the South. A singer and songwriter, The Grateful Dead produced several renditions of “Oh, Babe, It Ain’t No Lie,” a song she composed. Bob Dylan covered other songs she created including “Shake Sugaree” and “Freight Train.”

Other famous acts including Joan Baez, Gary Clark Jr., Peter, Paul and Mary, and The Quarrymen, who evolved into The Beatles, also covered her songs.

Warren and AOC have questions about Steve Mnuchin’s role in Sears’ collapse (and they have receipts)

Sen. Elizabeth Warren and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez are teaming up to ask important questions about Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin’s role in the collapse of retail empire Sears. More than 175,000 Sears employees lost their jobs while a handful of billionaires, including Mnuchin, walked away with billions. And Warren and Ocasio-Cortez want answers.

Mnuchin and his old pals sucked everything out of the company and left employees high and dry, without even a penny of severance pay. This is happening across the nation as investment firms buy up, raid, and tear down retail outlets. 

Russian-Style Kleptocracy Is Infiltrating America

For two years, in the early 1990s, Richard Palmer served as the CIA station chief in the United States’ Moscow embassy. The events unfolding around him—the dissolution of the Soviet Union and the rise of Russia—were so chaotic, so traumatic and exhilarating, that they mostly eluded clearheaded analysis. But from all the intelligence that washed over his desk, Palmer acquired a crystalline understanding of the deeper narrative of those times.

Much of the rest of the world wanted to shout for joy about the trajectory of history, and how it pointed in the direction of free markets and liberal democracy. Palmer’s account of events in Russia, however, was pure bummer. In the fall of 1999, he testified before a congressional committee to disabuse members of Congress of their optimism and to warn them of what was to come.

Hackers are passing around a mega-leak of 2.2 billion records

WHEN HACKERS BREACHED companies like Dropbox and LinkedIn in recent years—stealing 71 and 117 million passwords, respectively—they at least had the decency to exploit those stolen credentials in secret, or sell them for thousands of dollars on the dark web. Now, it seems, someone has cobbled together those breached databases and many more into a gargantuan, unprecedented collection of 2.2 billion unique usernames and associated passwords, and is freely distributing them on hacker forums and torrents, throwing out the private data of a significant fraction of humanity like last year’s phone book.